The Museum’s contemporary art collection features works by leading artists of the past three decades in the international art scene, including Norwegian-Danish artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset, Peter Doig, Peter Halley, Annette Messager, Haim Steinbach, Wilhelm Sasnal, Rainer Fetting, Anish Kapoor, Ged Quinn, Anselm Kiefer, Gregor Schneider, and many others.

The works – in various media, including painting, photography, sculpture, video, and installation – reflect a wide range of trends in contemporary art and the themes it engages with, such as personal identity and life in the age of globalism, the presence of a body in the face of an alienated and cynical reality, and the art work in a consumerist and capitalist world. Works by R. H. Quaytman, Matthew Day Jackson, Mirosław Bałka, Alex Israel, and others extend the range of expression of self-referential art – its boundaries, possibilities, and fluid definitions. The diversity of works in the collection adds up to a wide gamut of narratives, perspectives, and modes of operation, reflecting the breadth of contemporary art.

Roy Lichtenstein, Tel Aviv Museum Mural, 1989
Oil on board, acrylic on canvas, 840×700 cm each

Gift of the artist
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Anish Kapoor, Yet to be Titled, 1993
Fiberglass and pigment powder, 155×155×135.5 cm

Purchase through the generous assistance of the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel, 1993
© Anish Kapoor. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019

Elmgreen and Dragset, The Future, 2014
Powder-coated aluminum, epoxy-resin boy figure, clothing, shoes, 350×270×95 cm

Donated by the New Carlsberg Foundation and on behalf of the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel
© Elmgreen and Dragset
Courtesy of the artists and Galleri Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen

R. H. Quaytman, Chapter 29: Haqaq, 2014
Encaustic, gouache, oil silkscreen inks on wood panel, 50.8×50.8×1.91 cm

Gift of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery through the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel (BFAMI)
© R.H. Quaytman

Anselm Kiefer, Abendland (The Occident), 1991
Oil, emulsion, shellac, ashes, and lead on canvas, 250×440 cm

© Anselm Kiefer

Annette Messager, My Vows, 1992
Framed silver prints and strings, dimensions variable

Gift of Audrey Irmas to the American Friends of Tel Aviv Museum of Art, on loan to Tel Aviv Museum of Art, in honor of Herta and Paul Amir
© ADAGP, Paris, 2019

Gregor Schneider, High-Security Isolation Cell, 2006
Wood, metal, melamine, MDF, artificial leather, sponge, glass, aluminum, 230×220×337.5 cm

Gift of Sir Ronald Cohen and Lady Sharon Harel-Cohen
© Gregor Schneider / VG Bild-Kunst Bonn

Jim Dine, Hunter's Moon, 2007
Enamel on wood, h 23 cm (including the base, h 47 cm)

On Loan from Tel Aviv Museum’s American friends through the generosity of Diana Michener and Jim Dine, Mount Vernon, NY, in memory of Ron Pundak, 2017
© 2019 Jim Dine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Mirosław Bałka, Dead End, 2002/2017
Ash (produced in accordance with the artist’s instructions);
h 250 cm, width and depth variable

Gift of Cranford Collection, London, 2017
© Miroslaw Balka

Peter Doig, The House that Jacques Built, 1992
Oil on canvas, 200×250 cm

Gift of the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel, Young Friends Committee, 1995
© Peter Doig. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2019

The Museum’s contemporary art collection features works by leading artists of the past three decades in the international art scene, including Norwegian-Danish artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset, Peter Doig, Peter Halley, Annette Messager, Haim Steinbach, Wilhelm Sasnal, Rainer Fetting, Anish Kapoor, Ged Quinn, Anselm Kiefer, Gregor Schneider, and many others.

The works – in various media, including painting, photography, sculpture, video, and installation – reflect a wide range of trends in contemporary art and the themes it engages with, such as personal identity and life in the age of globalism, the presence of a body in the face of an alienated and cynical reality, and the art work in a consumerist and capitalist world. Works by R. H. Quaytman, Matthew Day Jackson, Mirosław Bałka, Alex Israel, and others extend the range of expression of self-referential art – its boundaries, possibilities, and fluid definitions. The diversity of works in the collection adds up to a wide gamut of narratives, perspectives, and modes of operation, reflecting the breadth of contemporary art.

More in The Collection