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The Museum’s collection of prints and drawings contains some 25,000 works on paper. These include a wide range of drawings, collages, independent prints in all varieties of techniques (including unique ones) series and albums of prints, and artist books. In addition, the collection holds sketches and drawings, some of which relate to artworks in various media, hence giving insight into the artists’ thinking and creative processes.

The collection has grown over the years thanks to the contributions of collectors from all over the world, as well as through purchases — especially in the field of Israeli art, whose history is represented comprehensively. In recent years, purchase of contemporary Israeli art has been made possible through the endeavors of the Voting for Art acquisition group.

Most of the works in the collection are from the modern period (the nineteenth and twentieth centuries). It was during this time that drawings and prints shook off their comparative marginal status in traditional art, to become independent modes of expression in their own right, with a wide range of distinctive expressions. The birth of collage in the second decade of the twentieth century, as well the re-evaluation of the potential of work on paper in the latter half of the century, has further informed the work in the field, which is continually revitalized in contemporary art.

A key and unique part of the collection is the compendium of works on paper — drawings, and especially prints — of early twentieth-century German Expressionism. The Dr. Karl Schwarz Collection and the Goeritz Collection, which were donated to the Museum in its early years, and acquisitions from the Hermann Struck Collection, led to the donation of yet another important collection — the Avraham Horodisch Collection from Amsterdam. Dr. Horodisch, a collector and publisher of prints in 1920s Germany, chose the Tel Aviv Museum of Art as a place worthy of preserving his important and rare collection, which includes mainly prints of second-generation (but also first-generation) German Expressionism.

Another important section of the collection is 150 prints by renowned Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, donated by Charles and Evelyn Kramer of New York, comprising a wide variety of the artist’s etchings, lithographs, and woodcuts, from the earliest ones that he created in Berlin in the 1890s to those produced in his final years. These cover most of the key motifs and imagery in Munch’s work, in their many variations.

Another important element of the collection is the set of 300 prints and books by Surrealist artists, also donated by Charles and Evelyn Kramer, which highlight the close collaboration between painters, writers, and poets of that movement. Also notable are the donations by Ms. Peggy Guggenheim of works by various Surrealist artists and their successors, and a wide variety of works on paper by European artists from the years 1954–75 from the Vera and Arturo Schwartz Collection, both of which greatly enhanced the Museum’s collection. Also of note is the collection of works on paper donated by the Riklis Collection of McRory Corporation, which represents a wide range of geometric abstract trends.

Eva Hesse, Untitled, 1964
Collage, gouache, and ink on paper, 49.5×64.8 cm

Gift of Helen Charash, New York, to the American Friends of Tel Aviv Museum of Art, 1984
© The Estate of Eva Hesse. Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Max Ernst, The Fugitive, from Histoire naturelle (Natural History), 1926
Collotype after pencil frottage, 32.5×50 cm

Gift of Charles and Evelyn Kramer, NYC, through AFTAM, 1990
© ADAGP, Paris, 2019

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Lady Lilith, ca. 1866
Chalk on paper, 62×57 cm

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Woolf through the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel, 1956
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Egon Schiele, The Prostitute, 1913
Pencil and gouache on paper, 48×31.5 cm

Purchase,1953
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Alberto Giacometti, Apples Reflected in the Mirror (Verso: Silvio under the Chandelier), 1953
Graphite on paper, 42×32.5 cm

Gift of Virginia and Herbert Lust, Connecticut, to the American Friends of Tel Aviv Museum of Art, 2004
© Succession Alberto Giacometti (Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, Paris + ADAGP, Paris) 2019

Edvard Munch, Madonna (Loving Woman, Conception), 1895
Lithograph, 60.1×44.4 cm

Gift of Charles and Evelyn Kramer, New York, to the American Friends of Tel Aviv Museum of Art, 1985
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Paul Klee, A Small Bouquet for Four 3H19, 1927
Pen and ink on paper, 30×46 cm

Alma Morgentau Bequest through America–Israel Cultural Foundation, 1955
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Juan Gris, Portrait of Josette Gris, 1917
Pencil on paper, 39.2×28.3 cm

Gift of the British Friends of the Art Museums of Israel, 1950
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Oskar Kokoschka, Self-Portrait (Poster for Der Sturm), 1910
Lithograph, Image: 66.7×44.4 cm, paper: 69.3×47.9

Gift of Charles and Evelyn Kramer, NY, through American Friends of Tel Aviv Museum of Art, 1983
© Foundation Oskar Kokoschka

Max Beckmann, Self-Portrait with a House Gable in the Background, 1918
Drypoint,
image: 30.5×25.6 cm;
paper: 56×45 cm

Gift of Dr. Abraham Horodisch, Amsterdam, 1986
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

Lesser Ury, At the Café, ca. 1910
Oil-pastel on paper, 41×55 cm

Gift of Mr. Arieh Shenkar, 1944
© Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Avigdor Arikha, Two Baguettes, 1990
Oil-pastel on paper, 25×73 cm

Donation of the Klatchkin Fund in honor of Hadassah Klatchkin, 1992
© ADAGP, Paris, 2019

The Museum’s collection of prints and drawings contains some 25,000 works on paper. These include a wide range of drawings, collages, independent prints in all varieties of techniques (including unique ones) series and albums of prints, and artist books. In addition, the collection holds sketches and drawings, some of which relate to artworks in various media, hence giving insight into the artists’ thinking and creative processes.

The collection has grown over the years thanks to the contributions of collectors from all over the world, as well as through purchases — especially in the field of Israeli art, whose history is represented comprehensively. In recent years, purchase of contemporary Israeli art has been made possible through the endeavors of the Voting for Art acquisition group.

Most of the works in the collection are from the modern period (the nineteenth and twentieth centuries). It was during this time that drawings and prints shook off their comparative marginal status in traditional art, to become independent modes of expression in their own right, with a wide range of distinctive expressions. The birth of collage in the second decade of the twentieth century, as well the re-evaluation of the potential of work on paper in the latter half of the century, has further informed the work in the field, which is continually revitalized in contemporary art.

A key and unique part of the collection is the compendium of works on paper — drawings, and especially prints — of early twentieth-century German Expressionism. The Dr. Karl Schwarz Collection and the Goeritz Collection, which were donated to the Museum in its early years, and acquisitions from the Hermann Struck Collection, led to the donation of yet another important collection — the Avraham Horodisch Collection from Amsterdam. Dr. Horodisch, a collector and publisher of prints in 1920s Germany, chose the Tel Aviv Museum of Art as a place worthy of preserving his important and rare collection, which includes mainly prints of second-generation (but also first-generation) German Expressionism.

Another important section of the collection is 150 prints by renowned Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, donated by Charles and Evelyn Kramer of New York, comprising a wide variety of the artist’s etchings, lithographs, and woodcuts, from the earliest ones that he created in Berlin in the 1890s to those produced in his final years. These cover most of the key motifs and imagery in Munch’s work, in their many variations.

Another important element of the collection is the set of 300 prints and books by Surrealist artists, also donated by Charles and Evelyn Kramer, which highlight the close collaboration between painters, writers, and poets of that movement. Also notable are the donations by Ms. Peggy Guggenheim of works by various Surrealist artists and their successors, and a wide variety of works on paper by European artists from the years 1954–75 from the Vera and Arturo Schwartz Collection, both of which greatly enhanced the Museum’s collection. Also of note is the collection of works on paper donated by the Riklis Collection of McRory Corporation, which represents a wide range of geometric abstract trends.

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